Flow by UniqueNudes.

This is the final print offering from the series Cool Water.

Tiny model.

#ArchivePicOfTheDay

BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :) BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :) BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :) BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :) BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :) BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming
The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :)

    BEHIND THE SCENES: Underwater Dreaming

    The usual shenanigans at a Nakayama Studios shoot. :)

    On a mossy bank by UniqueNudes.

    This is the second of three print offerings from the series Cool Water.

    Green.

    #ArchivePicOfTheDay

    Second shoot.

    Downstream by UniqueNudes.

    This is the first image and print offering from the series Cool Water, my first shoot using my rugged Canon D30 underwater rig.

    First shoot of today.

    Jump.

    #ArchivePicOfTheDay

    From The Desk Of

    Return to Moro Bay (downloadable content) »

    Blue. #ArchivePicOfTheDay

    A little something I shot while on “vacation”. :)

    Abandoned L.A. Zoo, circa 2005

    #ArchivePicOfTheDay

    A shoot from this time last year: Desert Rain

    #ArchivePicOfTheDay

    From The Desk Of

    The Basics of Wax Safety »

    actuallyuniquenudes:

    [REBLOG] Today I made model Jay Taylor in to my personal wax canvas, using multiple colors of wax to create some truly fascinating splatter art.  However, like with all of my dangerous shoots, I feel the need to mention some basic safety tips should you decide to try this at home, either for photography or for personal play.

    1) Use paraffin candles only.  They burn at somewhere around 120 deg Fahrenheit, whereas beeswax and other candles can burn as hot as 160 or more.  Usually, pillar candles tend to be made of paraffin and mineral oil, and burn at much cooler temps.  Avoid taper candles as they burn hotter AND don’t produce as much wax anyhow.  Start burning your candles up to an hour before the shoot, to develop a good wax pool.

    2) Make sure the area you are working in is well protected from wax splatter, and that you have fire extinguishers on hand and some soothing aloe lotion just in case.  Let your model/partner touch the melted wax inside a candle first so they know what to expect, especially if this is their first time.

    3) The subject should first be covered in oil or lotion to help facilitate wax removal at the end.  I like to use mineral oil, as it doesn’t conduct heat too fast and helps spread it out a bit.  Some oils can actually concentrate heat and make it burn more, so make sure you know what you are using.  Also make sure your model isn’t allergic to any dyes or perfumes if you are using colored/scented candles.

    4) The farther the pouring surface is away from the subject the cooler the wax is when it hits.  Too far away, though, and you risk splatter in the eyes or elsewhere. 6” - 18” is the norm.

    5) Lastly, be safe.  Start with a little wax in a less sensitive area, before just dumping an entire candles worth on a nipple.  Always stop if you sense any blistering, burning or too much pain.  Art just isn’t worth the suffering and/or possible lawsuit.

    I’ll post my preview image in just a bit, in the mean time, good luck with your own play!

    Cheers!
    — Richard

    (via i-am-tired-of-be-prepared)

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